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FAQ



If you don't find the answer you need here, contact your teacher or call the Psychology Learning Center at (585) 292-3264.

Do I really need to get the book?

The short answer is, YES! Why? Because the MCC custom version contains everything you will be tested on and and a new (not used) book gives you access to MyPsychLab. No matter how wonderfully your teacher explains things in class, or how great the teacher's notes are, they cannot cover everything you will need to know. You will be tested on the material in the book, whether or not your teacher covered it in class, and there is a lot of material, making it almost impossible for your teacher to cover all of it in class. And with a valid access code to MyPsychLab you will be able to complete an additional practice quiz and have access to the video features available online. MyPsychLab also includes an audio book so you can listen along to it.

Which book should I buy?

To have a valid access code for MyPsychLab you will need a new book. Used books will not contain access codes for this online accompaniment to the course. You may buy an access code alone without the book if you prefer to read online; the full textbook is available inside MyPsychLab in both visual and audio formats. Whether you buy the book new (with MyPsychLab access) or used (without MyPsychLab access), also buy the "Study Guide" for PSY-101.

What can I do if I missed a test deadline?

If you haven't taken any test on a particular unit, and the C-test deadline has gone by, ask your professor about getting permission to take a C test during final exams week. The professor can't give you permission to take an A or a B test late, but can, if you have missed the entire unit, let you take the C test late (very late in some cases). These makeup C tests are administered during final exams week only. You do not have a "right" to obtain a makeup C test: The decision to grant a late test is entirely up to your professor.

I don't have a photo ID; can I still take a test in the Learning Center?

Not a chance. No A test or C test will be given in the Psychology Learning Center without a photo ID. (However, it need not be an MCC student ID.) Staff will hold your ID while you are testing, or while you borrow materials on the study side of the Learning Center. Don't forget it when you leave. You don't need a photo ID for tests in your classroom.

Why do I need to keep my feedback sheets?

The feedback sheets are those pieces of paper you get when you take a test in class, showing your score. If you record your test exam number properly (either the long 7-digit number or the 2-digit number), you can use this sheet to review the in-class test. Also, it is your only record of having taken the in-class test in case something goes amiss and you need to ask us to double-check your test.

Can I find my grades by calling or emailing the Learning Center?

The short answer is, No, you can't. We are not allowed, by federal privacy laws, to give out grades by phone or E-mail. Grades are posted in Blackboard. Just click on "My grades on Testing" in the left-hand navigation column when you log into your class in Blackboard. Paper test grades are usually posted and updated the Wednesday or Thursday after the C-test deadline for the most recent unit. Check this regularly to make sure there aren't any errors. You can also ask your professor for your grade, but your professor might not be carrying a copy of the grades.

How do I correct a problem in my grade record?

If the computer grade report shows that one or more of your test scores is missing or incorrect, you need to go first to the place where you took that test (go to your professor for a B test, or to the Learning Center for an A or C test). Bring your feedback sheet for the test that is missing or incorrect; this provides useful information to help us find your test. We will look for the test that is missing or incorrect and you'll need to check back with us to see if anything was discovered.

I'm not happy with my test scores. What can I do to improve my grade?

We have a whole page of hints, called Tips For Success. Probably the most useful thing to do is to follow this plan:

  • Use the study guide as you work through each unit of the book. The study guide focuses on the material in the unit from which the tests are written, and shows the division of the unit into 20 learning objectives.
  • Take the practice test on the unit that you can find on computers in the Psychology Learning Center, and ask a tutor (your own in-class professor or one of the professors or student tutors in the Learning Center) to explain anything that's not clear.
  • Complete the practice quiz in MyPsychLab, looking things up in your book as you go through it.
  • Use the "Media Links" in MyPsychLab to get a broader view of the topics being covered.
  • Take the A test. Get a high (i.e., 95+) score? If so, you're done! If not, go over that test, question by question, with a tutor in the Learning Center.
  • Take the B test. Again, you can stop if you get a high score, or you can go over the test in the Learning Center, as long as you bring your feedback sheet in with you. Going over tests after you take them and before you take the next one is very important. It allows you to figure out what you don't yet know well, and to work on that before you take the test again.
  • Take the C test. Even if it seems your C test scores are always lower than your A or B test scores, on the whole, students gain close to 5% per unit when taking a C test after taking an A or a B test.

Do my scores in MyPsychLab affect my grade?

No. Each unit quiz in MyPsychLab is graded, but they are for your practice only.

Why is it so hard?

Well, it is and it isn't. If it seems hard it's partly because you're now jumping into the middle of a huge field of inquiry that has made countless discoveries about things that are quite complex, and the textbook and your professor are attempting to convey the important pieces of those discoveries using a language that helps with precision if not with communication. It's not easy to convey the facts and the explanations without being very careful about how we describe them, which often leads us to use uncommon terminology, or common words used in very specific ways. And there's a lot of it; researchers (smart, curious people) have been busy making scientific discoveries about human thought and action for over a century. Imagine for a moment any simple action of yours, like reading this answer: one aspect of the task of reading - and it's just one aspect of many - is how your eyes actually move across the page as you read. There are probably hundreds of research papers published that have examined eye movement during reading, looking at one part of it or another and trying to get it absolutely right (how long do we look at consonant strings? or unfamiliar words? or words in a context we easily understand? How does it start as children? Do our eye muscles interfere with fluid reading? How do our eyes react when we drift in thought? and so on). And that's just one very simple action. Meanwhile the task of introductory psychology is to get you to learn some of these discoveries and explanations, usually about broader activities like how memory works or why we call something "red," with respect for the precision that is behind them all. If it were easy, you'd have had it in grade school. But we only scratch the surface, so if you're careful about reading and studying you should be able to follow it.

What if I have more questions that aren't answered here?

There are lots of people who can answer your questions. You can talk to your professor before or after class, or to any of the professors during their hours in the Psychology Learning Center. An additional FAQ is available on Professor Ofsowitz's web site LINKED HERE. The Learning Center staff will also be glad to help you out. You can call the Brighton Learning Center at 292-3264.

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